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Nutrition

Better eating. Better health.

CHA Dietitians are experts in food and love eating real food. Every dietitian is licensed by the state, has a degree in nutrition and passed a board exam. They maintain their skills through continuing education.

Many of our team members have areas of specialty. These include Master’s Degrees, Certified Nutrition Support, Certified Diabetes Educator, Adult and Pediatric Weight management, Yoga Certifications or Personal Training.

How they help

Think of a dietitian as your food coach. They help you get healthy through food and lifestyle.

  • They help you balance the foods you love with the health you need, by modifying recipes and organizing grocery lists.
  • Help you create personal meal plans.
  • They are motivational trainers. They go beyond “teaching” you. Their goal is to inspire you to change.

We see patients in many settings

In addition to seeing patients in the hospital and our care centers, Registered Dietitians provide consultations and Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT). They also support our WIC (Women, Infants and Children) Program.

Helpful Information:

  • The Facts About Diabetes

    November is Diabetes Awareness Month.

    Get the facts about diabetes from CHA registered dietitian Paige Katzenstein!

    Myth #1: Eating too much sugar can cause diabetes.

    Fact: Drinking sugary drinks like soda, fruit punch and Gatorade is linked to Type 2 diabetes, but Type 2 is caused by both genetic and lifestyle factors such as lack of exercise, excessive weight or obesity, and processed food intake.

    Myth #2: People with diabetes need to eat differently from those without diabetes.

    False. A healthy meal plan containing whole grains like oats, fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and small amounts of healthy fats and healthy carbohydrates should be eaten by everyone.

    Myth #3: If you have diabetes you cannot eat chocolate, potatoes, rice or pasta.

    False: All foods are permitted but portion size is key. Ask your primary care doctor to refer you to a CHA registered dietitian who can help you learn about portion sizes that can control your blood sugar.

    Myth #4: Diabetes is not that serious a disease.

    Fact: If you manage your diabetes, eat a healthy diet, do some enjoyable physical activity and take medications as prescribed, you can prevent or delay organ complications related to diabetes.

    This article provides general information for educational purposes only. The information provided in this article, or through linkages to other sites, is not a substitute for medical or professional care, and you should not use the information in place of a visit, call consultation or the advice of your physician or other healthcare provider. Thank you.

    Link

    How to prepare a healthy Thanksgiving meal.

  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle Tips

    In recognition of May as Celiac Disease Awareness Month, CHA dietitian Rebecca Toutant has helpful tips for living a gluten-free lifestyle.

    In celiac disease, the immune system reacts to gluten and the reaction may cause short and long term problems. The treatment is to avoid all foods and products that are made with or have come in contact with wheat, rye, and barley. Follow these tips to educate yourself and stay healthy.

    • Eat unprocessed foods such as fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, milk, eggs, unprocessed beef, pork, poultry, fish, rice, corn, beans/lentils, potato, sweet potato, plantain, and yucca. This makes the diet easier, less expensive, and healthier.
    • If a food is processed (e.g., it comes in a box, bag, or can), read the label carefully. Look for the words “gluten-free.”
    • Be sure your soap, toothpaste, lip balm, lotion, and makeup are gluten-free.
    • Educate friends and family about cross-contamination. Wash your hands, pots, pans, utensils, countertops, stove tops, and cutting boards when preparing gluten-free foods.
    • Join a support network. Online forums and in-person support groups are great ways to learn more about new foods and local restaurants with gluten-free options.

    This article provides general information for educational purposes only. The information provided in this article, or through linkages to other sites, is not a substitute for medical or professional care, and you should not use the information in place of a visit, call consultation or the advice of your physician or other healthcare provider. Thank you.

  • What is Medical Nutrition Therapy?

    Medical Nutrition Therapy uses the power of food to improve your health.

    It can help you manage:

    • Weight loss
    • Blood sugar
    • Cholesterol
    • Blood pressure
    • Food allergies / intolerance
    • Eating during pregnancy
    • Infant / toddler feeding
    • Kidney disease
    • Stomach upset
    • Sports nutrition
    • Disordered eating

Contact Us

Outpatient Appointments:

Please call the main phone number at your CHA primary care center. Appointments are required.

Inpatient Services:

Available for patients staying overnight in the hospital.

CHA Cambridge Hospital, 1493 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA 02139

Phone: 617-665-1000

CHA Everett Hospital, 103 Garland St, Everett, MA 02149

Phone: 617-389-6270

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